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Messages - lance

Pages: [1] 2
1
Food & Diet / Re: Phase 1????
« on: June 04, 2012, 08:04:24 PM »
Hi, I'm quite new to this forum, but I have been eating "paleo" for awhile now. 

I'm not questioning the diet's effectiveness or anything such as that.  As I said I also eat this way.  I just didn't understand why during phase 1 you are allowed to eat anything.  But I do now thanks.

2
General Discussion / Re: Up and Running
« on: June 02, 2012, 08:31:10 PM »
If I'm taking in lots of water while exercising in the heat I make sure I'm getting enough sodium and electrolytes.

These are a good Paleo choice...
http://www.rei.com/product/752086/camelbak-elixir-12-serving


Thanks for this post I actually tried looking for something like this a couple years ago but couldn't find anything

3
Food & Diet / Re: Phase 1????
« on: June 02, 2012, 08:25:45 PM »
If no metabolic switch would occur without phase 1 then I would be very weak and sick or even dead right now.  But you never really answered my question.  I read the stuff already about the phase, I want to know the "science" behind it and the reasons why it would work as it is said to work.

4
Food & Diet / Re: Back onto the Forum and back to the good food
« on: June 01, 2012, 11:26:23 PM »
To get my nutrition in a marathon I would bring a gun, shoot a squirrel and eat its insides, then use its hide to fashion moccasins and finish the race paleo without those processed running shoes

5
Food & Diet / Phase 1????
« on: June 01, 2012, 11:20:30 PM »
Hi, I'm quite new to this forum, but I have been eating "paleo" for awhile now.  I have understood that skipping meals or fasting for a day can be beneficial, I do not fully understand the reasoning behind phase 1.  When I started I immediately cut out grains and anything processed or that had to be cooked, but I still ate regular meals throughout the day while teaching my body to burn fat.  I found it harder to initially stick to the diet if I let my stomach stay empty for too long, and my hunger pain and lack of carbs would drive me straight to the grains.  And how, when you are able to gorge on grains and other processed foods during phase 1, does that teach your body to burn fat.  It seems to me that it would just cause a sinusoidal graph of blood sugar vs time.  But how does it effect your metabolism?

6
General Discussion / Re: One week in, 100 pounds to go!
« on: June 01, 2012, 11:08:53 PM »
That's fantastic, great work stick with it.  After switching to this diet and realizing how much better and healthier I feel, I wish other people would try it for just 3 or 4 months out of their lives and see if they don't feel or see a change.  It's always great to see a new-comer post about starting.  Keep updating us let us know how you're doing, what you're eating, etc.

7
Add some photos! / Re: FOOD PORN (G-rated)
« on: June 01, 2012, 08:52:39 PM »
Here's the white-tailed buck I shot 4 days ago.  (Not huge, but the picture makes it look smaller than it really was:  about 130 pounds on the hoof, and 100 pounds dressed-out.)  My family feasted on some delicious loin steaks from this noble animal last night.

Nice!  I would probably take its heart out and eat it right there.

8
General Discussion / Re: First 7 days
« on: June 01, 2012, 08:48:48 PM »
Keep it up no matter how crappy it feels.  Whether it's temptation at a restaurant or party or bakery section of the food store, or the difficult switch from those unhealthy grains, don't give up. 

Phytic acid has a strong binding affinity to minerals such as calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc; this results in precipitation, making the minerals unavailable for absorption in the intestines. [4] Phytic acids are common in the hulls of nuts, seeds and grains.

Glucosinolates prevent the uptake of iodine, affecting the function of the thyroid and thus are considered goitrogens.[5] They are found in broccoli, brussel sprouts, cabbage and cauliflower.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-nutritional_factor

9
General Discussion / Re: New and loving this lifestyle.
« on: June 01, 2012, 08:48:28 PM »
Keep it up no matter how crappy it feels.  Whether it's temptation at a restaurant or party or bakery section of the food store, or the difficult switch from those unhealthy grains, don't give up. 

Phytic acid has a strong binding affinity to minerals such as calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc; this results in precipitation, making the minerals unavailable for absorption in the intestines. [4] Phytic acids are common in the hulls of nuts, seeds and grains.

Glucosinolates prevent the uptake of iodine, affecting the function of the thyroid and thus are considered goitrogens.[5] They are found in broccoli, brussel sprouts, cabbage and cauliflower.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-nutritional_factor

10
General Discussion / Re: Up and Running
« on: June 01, 2012, 08:45:56 PM »
Phytic acid has a strong binding affinity to minerals such as calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc; this results in precipitation, making the minerals unavailable for absorption in the intestines. [4] Phytic acids are common in the hulls of nuts, seeds and grains.

Glucosinolates prevent the uptake of iodine, affecting the function of the thyroid and thus are considered goitrogens.[5] They are found in broccoli, brussel sprouts, cabbage and cauliflower.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-nutritional_factor

11
Food & Diet / Re: Best cuts of red meat
« on: June 01, 2012, 08:02:52 PM »
Do buffalo and antelopes hunt and eat meat?

12
General Discussion / Re: An I too young?!?! Please help
« on: June 01, 2012, 07:54:27 PM »
Cavemen were generally larger and stronger I believe until grains and processed foods were introduced.  You will not lose muscle mass as long as you consume an adequate amount of nutrients.  Once your body is adjusted.  Try switching to leaner and leaner cuts of meat keeping a healthy amount of protein to encourage use of body fat.  Maybe every week cut out around 500 fat calories, just keep that protein up (not a ridiculous amount I mean).  You keep that protein up you'll only lose fat.  I did this diet a couple years ago for 3 months and got really cut, my bench went up from 195 to about 215 I dropped from 175 to 165 pounds in weight.  Then I went to school and said screw it, now I regret that, as I climbed up to 200 pounds and got weaker.

13
General Discussion / Re: Yolk?
« on: June 01, 2012, 07:51:15 PM »
Definitely eat it.  Tastes good and good for you.  I like to throw 2-3 eggs in the blender with some berries maybe a green banana and some coconut milk I've never tasted any egg especially with ice blended.  Easy way to get protein and fat.  Don't worry about salmonella.  The chance of salmonella in an egg is so ridiculously slim, and its not much higher for salmonella to get into the meat of a chicken either.  I read somewhere the few cases of salmonella were not even from chicken.

14
Food & Diet / Re: raw foods
« on: May 28, 2012, 11:15:03 PM »
Found it here:

http://www.newtreatments.org/doc.php/WisdomExperience/188

Never tried that link.  I just googled raw meat vs cooked meat.  There's a bunch of information.

15
Fitness & Exercise / Re: Maintaining/Building Strength
« on: May 28, 2012, 11:06:20 PM »
You could try eating more, but it seems like you may be working out a bit too much.  If you do strength training m/w/f then add swimming, rowing, running on top of that you're using all the same muscle groups intensely every day.  It might be a good idea to rest 48 hours (1 rest day) after a strength workout before using that muscle again.  I usually do full body strength training m/w/f sometimes as a circuit for 20-30 minutes.  Don't go too heavy on my legs though.  And I'll do some sprint training too as part of a separate routine. 

16
Food & Diet / Re: raw foods
« on: May 28, 2012, 10:53:23 PM »
Not trying to.  Just asking what anyone else does, you first gave reason to not eat raw meat but to eat cooked.  So I gave reasons to support my decision.

17
General Discussion / Re: New member saying Hello to Everyone
« on: May 28, 2012, 10:47:41 PM »
Atkins is low carb isn't it?  If so I wouldn't eat a high carb meal every day if you've been on atkins, I would keep the carbs just as low for phase 1.  But hey I'm no expert on this I just registered but I've been eating grain free for several months now and I feel great.  Remember the goal isn't just to lose weight or hit a certain weight but to healthy and strong (not bulked up necessarily).

And if you find that you're not dropping any more fat after a couple weeks then try eating 500 or so less calories from fat a day to try to encourage using body fat for energy in the absence of dietary fat.  Or include some more physical activities.  Or both maybe.  Again, I'm no expert.

18
Food & Diet / Re: raw foods
« on: May 28, 2012, 10:34:45 PM »
"energy-dense animal-derived foods, such as soft bone marrow and brain matter, were the reason humans developed these characteristics, not cooking."

The article was filled with many ifs.  It's comparing completely different diets.  Our ancestors began eating more meat in general, right? Chimps eat mostly plant matter.  Cooked may be easier to digest, but raw is still digestible none the less, it may just take longer and more work from the liver. 

And...

+ Heating proteins cause them to cross-link and form mutated proteins
From: www.13.waisays.com/cooking
Due to heat, preparing food originates new substances. Most of these new substances originate from proteins reacting upon carbohydrates. Some of these substances cause cancer, or brain diseases, and impair neurotransmitter function and metabolism.
To be able to grow old and healthy, you need to consume as little prepared food. (prepared proteinacous food in particular).

+ Raw foods contain the naturally available enzymes
Raw foods are on the other hand easier to digest because they contain the natural enzymes. Heating destroys these enzymes. However, it's uncertain if these enzymes survive the stomach acid.

+ Raw fats have better properties than heated fats
Raw fats have much better cleansing / detoxification properties than heated fats. Also all poly-unsaturated fats (and also mono-unsaturated) fats are damaged by heating and cause massive amounts of free radicals.

+ Raw foods contain less free radicals
Heating increases chemical reaction speed and significantly increases the forming of free radicals.

+ Raw foods contain more vitamins
Heating destroys specific vitamins, so raw foods contain more vitamins
 

19
Food & Diet / Re: raw foods
« on: May 28, 2012, 09:47:37 PM »
+ Heating proteins cause them to cross-link and form mutated proteins
From: www.13.waisays.com/cooking
Due to heat, preparing food originates new substances. Most of these new substances originate from proteins reacting upon carbohydrates. Some of these substances cause cancer, or brain diseases, and impair neurotransmitter function and metabolism.
To be able to grow old and healthy, you need to consume as little prepared food. (prepared proteinacous food in particular).

+ Raw foods contain the naturally available enzymes
Raw foods are on the other hand easier to digest because they contain the natural enzymes. Heating destroys these enzymes. However, it's uncertain if these enzymes survive the stomach acid.

+ Raw fats have better properties than heated fats
Raw fats have much better cleansing / detoxification properties than heated fats. Also all poly-unsaturated fats (and also mono-unsaturated) fats are damaged by heating and cause massive amounts of free radicals.

+ Raw foods contain less free radicals
Heating increases chemical reaction speed and significantly increases the forming of free radicals.

+ Raw foods contain more vitamins
Heating destroys specific vitamins, so raw foods contain more vitamins

20
Food & Diet / raw foods
« on: May 28, 2012, 08:40:16 PM »
Anyone eat raw meat?  How do you prepare all your foods.  Especially liver.  I've only had raw beef, mostly been eating raw cuts of steak, but I do sear it on the grill for a bit but the inside is all raw, chewy, fatty meat.  I don't have a very good quality source for meat, but I would like to eat raw chicken and pork.

What does everyone else do?

21
Fitness & Exercise / Re: Yard Work!
« on: May 28, 2012, 08:32:50 PM »
Mowing for me consists of shifting gears on our riding mower, but I sure can vouch for other work such as cutting down trees, hauling heavy branches, digging, and that sort of work as great exercise.

22
Fitness & Exercise / Re: Newcomer - Lifting Supplement question
« on: May 28, 2012, 08:31:17 PM »
There are many complications to digestion and nutrient absorption and I have read many different things.  Basically what everything seems to support is that if you eat enough whole meats and organs and some vegetables you will get ample amounts of proteins and fats.  As for milk substitutes, I'm pretty sure coconut milk is fine and that tastes great.  I once read that proteins are digested and absorbed better with their natural stores of fat in whole form better than supplements.  I don't know if any of this is true, but I did read that once and I believe it is worth googling.

I can say that I used to practice jui jitsu up until a couple months ago when I hurt my back out of my own stupidity dead lifting (still trying to recover).  Before I switched to this diet I would use a protein supplement 2-3 times a day.  After I switched over to this diet I stopped using the supplements for no reason (just gradually forgot about them) and have consumed much more meat and I have felt nothing but increased energy levels. 

23
The Voting Booth / Re: Workouts
« on: May 28, 2012, 06:21:16 PM »
Honestly how many calories do you really burn from doing cardio, and look at how much time it takes up. I say the best way is to permanently increase your metabolism by increasing strength/muscle mass (not necessarily body builder).  My workouts last around 25 minutes 3 times a week.  I do a few warmup sets and some heavy sets of compound lifts.  Usually three separate exercises each work out.

I see cardio as just that:  improves cardiovascular function.  And for that I have soccer or surfing.  But when I am land locked and don't play sports during the fall and spring semesters at school I don't gain weight or anything.  I eat about the same amount as well

24
Philosophy / Re: Die Hard Christian
« on: May 28, 2012, 06:15:39 PM »
You could say when one animal starts dying out another may take its place, us humans would be replacing the beef.  So where would our new source of meat come from...

Kidding, but I see your point even though my response didn't reflect so.

25
Food & Diet / Re: Tired
« on: May 28, 2012, 06:03:15 PM »
Eat some raw liver, I've heard that liver is great for energy levels.  I've heard the best way to prepare it is to cup it up in tiny pieces so you can swallow it like pills then freeze it for 14 days, then swallow.  Don't take my word for it though do a bit of googling.  Sounds gross, but any raw animal meat is great for you, higher water content (natural source of water) and much more nutrient dense.  Who needs vegetables when you have raw meat/organs.

Traditional breakfast foods would be eggs and bacon (pretty sure bacon is alright, someone correct me if I'm wrong), but I just eat anything whenever I am hungry.  Sometimes I'll have steak for breakfast or chicken or fish, I had a beef heart this morning.  

Definitely stick with it, even if you feel cloudy minded just push through it for the first couple weeks then you'll feel great.  People at work complain all the time if they get a good lunch and I'm going strong without anything.  I could do with a meal at work but I'm too lazy to prepare something in a suitable package.  I'll miss meals, and still have high energy levels.  I suppose since we're metabolizing fat all the time we always have a good source, and our bodies don't run out of carbohydrates, blood sugar plummets, and we don't feel like crap because we crave more.

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