Caveman Power Forum

General Discussion => Food & Diet => Topic started by: TrailGrrl on June 14, 2008, 02:01:22 PM

Title: farmer's market
Post by: TrailGrrl on June 14, 2008, 02:01:22 PM
I got up early enough to hit the farmer's market today :D

I found all kinds of great stuff... locally grown beef (pork and lamb as well, but I only bought some beef ribeyes and tenderloins this week), free range organic chicken, free range organic brown eggs, strawberries, raw honey from a local beekeeper, tomatoes, tomato plants, green onions, fresh spices, homemade salsa (mild red and some green tomatillo that had teeth and claws on the afterbite), and, the coolest (never thought I'd say that) thing that is really hard to find... real organic lard.

Now if I can figure out how to cook with the lard... shouldn't be too hard, my mom used to do it when I was little!

It was also fun to talk to all the vendors.  You can call the meat vendors ahead of time with an order and they will bring it for you on Saturday to pick up at the market.

The new location in the town square seems to be working out well for them.  Lots of cars were pulling in, and people were bringing their kids.

I cleaned the strawberries which were a beautiful bright red color.  First thing I noticed when biting in... they are not nearly as sweet as store-bought organic ones.  It's a little strange at first, but a clean taste after you get used to the fact that it's not gonna be super super sweet.

TrailGrrl, foraging her #$$ off.
Title: Re: farmer's market
Post by: Phanatic on June 14, 2008, 10:44:19 PM
The strawberries we get these days in supermarkets have absolutely no taste. They look nice and big and red, but you might as well be eating cardboard.
Title: Re: farmer's market
Post by: Matt Emery on June 15, 2008, 04:52:01 AM
Nice foraging TrailGrrl  :)

The strawberries we get these days in supermarkets have absolutely no taste. They look nice and big and red, but you might as well be eating cardboard.

I found this with Tomatoes as well.
Title: Re: farmer's market
Post by: Tobias on September 04, 2008, 11:15:44 PM
You will find this with nearly all industrial farmed foods, and any organic foods from recently converted farms. Its caused by the utter lack of trace minerals and nutrients and minimal levels of the more common ones. These levels have been plummeting like a stone since the agrochemical revolution which has obliterated the topsoil across the world. Most stuff grown today becomes little more than water and cellulose, quite literally soggy cardboard.
Title: Re: farmer's market
Post by: Phanatic on September 05, 2008, 02:21:56 AM
You will find this with nearly all industrial farmed foods, and any organic foods from recently converted farms. Its caused by the utter lack of trace minerals and nutrients and minimal levels of the more common ones. These levels have been plummeting like a stone since the agrochemical revolution which has obliterated the topsoil across the world. Most stuff grown today becomes little more than water and cellulose, quite literally soggy cardboard.

It's true. If you're not pissed off at the current state of affairs in the world, you're not looking hard enough.
Title: Re: farmer's market
Post by: Matt Emery on September 05, 2008, 10:01:16 AM
You will find this with nearly all industrial farmed foods, and any organic foods from recently converted farms. Its caused by the utter lack of trace minerals and nutrients and minimal levels of the more common ones. These levels have been plummeting like a stone since the agrochemical revolution which has obliterated the topsoil across the world. Most stuff grown today becomes little more than water and cellulose, quite literally soggy cardboard.

I'm no Agronomist, but what you're saying makes perfect sense to me - I see a valid role for for multi-vitamin supplements due to such lack of nutritional compounds in soils.
Title: Re: farmer's market
Post by: BigKhanz on September 05, 2008, 06:27:06 PM
The problem with the strawberries and tomatoes isn't a matter of the farming, it's a problem with the production. The reason you are getting such beautiful peppers, tomatoes, strawberries, and apples that have a really subdued taste is the wax. Supermarkets and vendors use wax to give a shinnier, healthier looking finish to alot of items. It interferes with the way items ripen and covers up the flavor drastically.
Title: Re: farmer's market
Post by: munster on September 14, 2008, 03:58:30 PM
on the farmers market issue, your average small to medium farmer will grow good quality food that actually tastes good if you get it fresh. the problem with supermarket chains is the centralised buying which knocks the small guy out and also he can't give them the credit they want either. but at the end of the day people have to support shops that support local farmers especially when it comes to organic food. remember if farmers get encouragement they will respond.